The issue

Biodiversity is under threat with species declining at the fastest rate ever recorded. The biggest threats include habitat fragmentation and loss, climate change, pollution, invasive species and pathogens. At the same time, society is entirely dependent on ecosystem services, such as clean air and water, nutrient cycling, pollination and healthy soils, arising from the interactions between biodiversity and the physical and chemical environment. It is therefore essential to understand the extent that diversity links to the resilience of ecosystems.

UKCEH brings together the scientific capabilities and data necessary to understand the status of species populations, and links between biodiversity and ecosystem resilience. Our monitoring, experimentation, and modelling gives us the capacity to deliver solutions for conserving and restoring biodiversity.

Our role

Our flagship Biological Records Centre brings together the scientific capabilities and data resources necessary to assess the status and trends of species populations. Integrating work across monitoring, experimentation, and modelling gives us the capacity to deliver solutions for conserving and restoring biodiversity.

Our commitment

  • To better understand the response and interactions between biodiversity and environmental change.
  • To define the impact of the many drivers of change, including climate, land use, invasive species and globalisation.
  • To develop effective, evidence-based mitigation strategies that inform and improve biosecurity preparedness, and halt and reverse the decline in biodiversity.

 Our research

Japanese Knotweed © Crown copyright
Providing robust information on invasive plant species
© Shutterstock
Investigating the biodiversity, climate change and ecosystem services
Field Sampling © Tom Pottinger
Innovative development improving understanding of rare fish
Solardomes © Gina Mills
Monitoring biodiversity to safeguard natural capital and ecosystem services
© Shutterstock
Engaging children with science and investigating bumblebee ecology