Hydrology literally means the study of water. This involves measuring and observing everything from rainfall to the chemical makeup of rivers. Hydrology can then provide information on floods, droughts, drinking water, erosion, and weather modelling.

Water cycles have evolved over long periods of time to deal with environmental pressures. They are not, however, adapted to deal with new threats such as climate change, population growth, pollution and land-use change. It is difficult to tell just how these pressures will affect complex water systems and the biodiversity that relies on them. 

CEH work on hydrology

Projects

Monitoring sites

Research Facilities

Flood Estimation Handbook
Estimates flood risk in order to develop resilient infrastructure
Map indicating river flows from October 2017 UK hydrological summary
Influence of dry winter/spring of 2016/2017 still apparent in groundwater levels and some rivers
Flooded fields in Oxfordshire
Researchers, farmers, communities and local authorities among collaborative team
Ed Tipping
Professor Ed Tipping praised for influencing and inspiring the work of environmental scientists around the world over the past 39 years
UK river flows in August 2017 hydrological summary
Groundwater levels remain below normal in areas despite wet summer
Dr Andrew Singer
The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology participates in first national PhD training programme to tackle antimicrobial resistance

Pages