Atmospheric pollution is the release of a harmful chemical or material into the atmosphere. The consequences can be devastating - carbon dioxide, for example, is one of the major causes of climate change, while nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide combine to form harmful acid rain. Not all pollution is directly man-made, however, such as the release of ammonia from livestock. Ammonia is toxic to many aquatic animals and can lead to soil acidification and smog.

Atmospheric pollution is also harmful to human health. It has driven cancer to be the main cause of death in China, the poster country for smog, and more than half of Americans are breathing unacceptable standards of air. In the UK alone it is thought that air pollution causes  29,000 deaths every year.

CEH work on atmospheric pollution

Projects

Monitoring Sites

Research Facilities

Fieldwork on the PEATBOG project
Peat bogs 'tougher than we thought' but may still be vulnerable to rapid or extreme environmental change
Cows in farm housing
The potential of methane-consuming bacteria in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from manure slurry crusts
iLEAPS
Theme for 5th Integrated Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Processes Study (iLEAPS) to focus on understanding the impact of land-atmosphere exchanges
Aerial view of an informal settlement, Nairobi CC BY-SA3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nairobi_Kibera_04.JPG
Taking forward the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) resolution: pilot to determine air quality drivers for Sub-Saharan Africa (AQD-Nairobi)

Pages