By 2050 there will be an estimated 9.6 billion people on the planet. To feed that many people, we will have to produce nearly twice as much food as we do now. Doing this sustainably, in an efficient, nature-friendly way, is a great challenge.

CEH's long history of research into the wide-ranging impacts of agriculture on the environment feeds into addressing this challenge. Our research ranges from the effects of pesticides on bees, to fertilisers' effect on water quality, to plants' response to nitrogen pollution.

CEH's work on agriculture

Projects

Research Facilities

Map of UK's most deciduous areas
New hi-tech map reveals the most urban, most wooded and most arable counties
Professor Alan Gray
British Ecological Society Award made to CEH Fellow Professor Alan Gray in recognition of exceptional voluntary service to the Society and its community
Oilseed rape field
Innovative satellite map shows reduction in oilseed rape grown across Britain
Cows in farm housing
The potential of methane-consuming bacteria in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from manure slurry crusts
Professor Alan Jenkins with Professor Ajit K Chaturvedi
New link with Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Trees and soil
Study sets out way of valuing soil’s contribution to food and wider ecosystem services across Europe
Upper Conwy
Project looks at ways to reduce environmental impacts of agriculture without reducing productivity in Welsh uplands
Fields in Wales
Farmers, land managers and foresters contributing to improvements in Welsh countryside for people and nature, new report shows
Fields in Wales
Mae ffermwyr, rheolwyr tir a choedwigwyr yn cyfrannu at wella cefn gwlad Cymru ar gyfer pobl a byd natur, yn ôl adroddiad newydd

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