Prof. Helen Elizabeth Roy's blog

Predictions and priorities to prevent new invasive non-native species arrivals to the British Indian Ocean Territory

CEH ecologists are contributing to international efforts to strengthen biosecurity in the British Indian Ocean Territory. Prof Helen Roy explains more...

A magical and remote atoll, the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) comprises extensive coral reefs and unique terrestrial habitats. Not only does BIOT host the Indian Ocean’s largest breeding colonies of the red-footed booby Sula sula, but also high densities of coconut crabs and endangered hawksbill and green turtles.

Caribbean workshop focuses on invasive alien species

Professor Helen Roy reports back from a workshop that she led alongside Centre for Ecology & Hydrology colleagues Jodey Peyton and Dr Oli Pescott on Grand Cayman last week. The event's purpose was to determine which invasive alien species were likely to arrive, establish and impact on biodiversity, ecosystems, human health and the economy across the Caribbean UK Overseas Territories within the next 10 years.

Sharing an enthusiasm for citizen science (and ladybirds) across the world

Chile has incredible appeal for ecologists. The Andes extend alongside the eastern edge of Chile and essentially render it isolated from the rest of South America. Not surprisingly the landscapes of this long and narrow country are extremely diverse and the biodiversity even more so. The species list for Chile includes around 31,000 species and about 37% of these are endemic. Justifiably Chile is considered a global biodiversity hotspot.

The buzz of citizen science

Professor Helen Roy writes about the research and citizen science contribution played by participants in the Big Bumblebee Discovery

Bumblebees are much loved insects but they also play an important ecological role – pollination. There has been concern in recent years that some species of bumblebee, alongside other pollinating insects (including other types of bee and hoverflies), are in decline.

A decade of recording harlequin ladybirds in the UK

Dr Helen Roy of CEH is among the scientists behind the UK Ladybird Survey which, thanks to the help of the public, has monitored the rapid spread of the non-native harlequin ladybird in the UK from its first confirmed appearance in 2004. Coinciding with a new paper in Ecological Entomology, Helen looks back at ten years of harlequin ladybird recording.

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