Hydrology literally means the study of water. This involves measuring and observing everything from rainfall to the chemical makeup of rivers. Hydrology can then provide information on floods, droughts, drinking water, erosion, and weather modelling.

Water cycles have evolved over long periods of time to deal with environmental pressures. They are not, however, adapted to deal with new threats such as climate change, population growth, pollution and land-use change. It is difficult to tell just how these pressures will affect complex water systems and the biodiversity that relies on them. 

CEH work on hydrology

Projects

Monitoring sites

Research Facilities

Flood Estimation Handbook
Estimates flood risk in order to develop resilient infrastructure
Harvest rice field in Xiangtan, Hunan, China (CC BY-SA 3.0) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rice_field,_Hunan.JPG#filelinks
CEH signs collaboration agreement with the Hunan Provincial Agriculture Committee
Into the Blue
Last week scientists from across the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology took part in NERC’s ‘Into the Blue’ public engagement and networking event held at Manchester Airport Runway Visitors Park.
Soil Moisture Deficits
September 2016 Hydrological Summary for the UK
India-UK Water Security Centre
A major water research initiative between UK and India researchers launches today
Pollution in a small urban river in the Thames basin
New frontiers in water resources
UK river flows in the June 2016 hydrological summary
June 2016 Hydrological Summary for the UK
Dr Toby Marthews, a land surface modeller at CEH, speaks at the High Impact Weather conference
CEH scientists at 3-day conference
Water, People and Cooperation, UNESCO water programme book
CEH water research closely related to international agendas

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