Hydrology literally means the study of water. This involves measuring and observing everything from rainfall to the chemical makeup of rivers. Hydrology can then provide information on floods, droughts, drinking water, erosion, and weather modelling.

Water cycles have evolved over long periods of time to deal with environmental pressures. They are not, however, adapted to deal with new threats such as climate change, population growth, pollution and land-use change. It is difficult to tell just how these pressures will affect complex water systems and the biodiversity that relies on them. 

CEH work on hydrology

Projects

Monitoring sites

Research Facilities

Flood Estimation Handbook
Estimates flood risk in order to develop resilient infrastructure
Flooding in England
Providing hydrology and forecast model expertise
Somerset Levels
Long-term strategies for the UK's largest wetland area
The river Elbe floods Meissen, Germany in 2013
Establishing a worldwide hydrological status and outlook system
Mekedatu, place where the Kaveri River flows through a narrow ravine. (CC BY 2.0) By Renjith Sasidharan https://www.flickr.com/photos/renjithks/3845336695
Upscaling local water management interventions to inform larger-scale decision-making in the Cauvery basin, India
Flooded Lyth Valley, Cumbria in December
Q&A with Nick Reynard, CEH's Natural Hazards Science Area Lead
Harvest rice field in Xiangtan, Hunan, China (CC BY-SA 3.0) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rice_field,_Hunan.JPG#filelinks
CEH signs collaboration agreement with the Hunan Provincial Agriculture Committee
Into the Blue
Last week scientists from across the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology took part in NERC’s ‘Into the Blue’ public engagement and networking event held at Manchester Airport Runway Visitors Park.
Soil Moisture Deficits
September 2016 Hydrological Summary for the UK
India-UK Water Security Centre
A major water research initiative between UK and India researchers launches today

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