Biodiversity, though there is no universal definition, usually refers to all the life on Earth. This includes everything from microorganisms to plants to the mighty humpback whale. Conservationists and managers often use a more specific definition, including the genetic and ecosystem diversity which allows habitats to survive sudden changes.

Biodiversity provides us with our food, fibres, rubbers, oils and many of our drugs and medicines. It regulates the atmosphere, churns out our water and produces fertile soils. On a less quantifiable level, natural spaces are also important for mental health.

Biodiversity is under threat, with some estimates saying that 8 species a day are dying out. There are many reasons for this, but some of the biggest threats are habitat fragmentation and loss, climate change, pollution, invasive species and over-exploitation. Unless we address these threats, the planet may soon experience a species decline equal to the loss of the dinosaurs. 

CEH work on biodiversity

Projects

Monitoring sites

Research facilities

 

 

Land Cover Map 2015 coming soon text
The latest land cover information for the UK
Northern Ireland in Land Cover Map 2007
Land cover information for the whole of the UK
Bee visiting a flower
Most thorough review of pollinator science to date
Into the Blue
Last week scientists from across the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology took part in NERC’s ‘Into the Blue’ public engagement and networking event held at Manchester Airport Runway Visitors Park.
Innovation in Plant Biosecurity 2017
Conference organised against the backdrop of the Plant Biosecurity Strategy for Great Britain, released in 2014
Sand dunes and landscape
The science behind our unique coastal biodiversity
Conwy catchment
Integrated hydrological and ecological monitoring and research in a varied coastal catchment
Lifetime achievement Sarah Wanless and Mike Harris
Deserved accolade for seabird ecologists
Borrowdale, Lake District. Photo by Andy Sier
Integrating data, models and scientific knowledge on natural capital to support research and decision-making
State of Nature 2013 and State of Nature 2016 report covers
Trends and biases in biological records

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